The Blue and White Porcelain- A Pearl of the Porcelain World

The Blue and White Porcelain, as its name suggests, is a form of pottery which features a white background embellished with a blue design. The Blue and White Porcelain, the treasure among Chinese porcelains, is characterized by refined and white quality, simple but elegant designs, bright colors, and rich pattern decoration. It also boasts artistic charms of Chinese Ink and Wash Painting, with both practical and ornamental functions, and suits both refined and popular tastes. Blue and White Porcelain bears very high value in terms of artistic appreciation, renowned both at home and abroad as “a pearl of the porcelain world”.

blue and white porcelain

Technique

Blue-white porcelain actually belongs to color-glazed porcelain and the coloring agent used is called cobalt oxide. First, using cobalt oxide, paint the unbaked mould, then apply a layer of translucent glaze over it and bake it at 1,300 degrees Celsius. The cobalt oxide will be reduced under the high temperature into a blue hue, which will be very bright and durable without poisonous lead. Each piece of monochrome-glazed porcelain has a single bright color with an exquisite design. A very good mastery of controlling temperature changes and content composition is required. Blue-white porcelain is renowned as the “ever-lasting blue flower.”

blue and white porcelain

History

The history of Blue and White porcelain in China can be traced back to the Tang Dynasty (618-907), but those were only very primitive blue and white products at that time.

blue and white porcelain

Up to Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368), the manufacturing of Blue and White Porcelain went into maturity. Blue-white porcelain of the Yuan Dynasty is large, with thick roughcast. Generally, the works include big bottles, pots, bowls and plates, with the traditional flavor of the Tang (618-907) and Song (960-1279) dynasties. Due to the underdeveloped techniques, there are two interfaces on the body and several veins inside the body. The roughcast is not as smooth as that of the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties and the glaze is thicker due to more iron in the raw glaze materials.

The Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) was reputed as the “Golden Age” of the Blue and White Porcelain production. The blue-white porcelain became increasingly popular, and since the 14th century, manufacturers have shipped blue-white porcelain to world markets.

blue and white porcelain

The porcelain reached its peak in the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). Its thin, translucent quality and exotic motifs made it very valuable throughout Europe and the colonies, ranking first among blue-white porcelain nationwide.

In the 17th century, blue and white porcelain became popular in Europe, and pottery manufacturers began large-scale efforts to produce pieces that closely resembled Chinese ware. However, these manufacturers lacked both the raw materials — namely kaolin clay — as well as the technical knowledge necessary to reproduce the Chinese style exactly. Consequently, they devised a new production technique which suited their resources and abilities. Their pieces featured stamped or stenciled rather than hand-painted designs, and utilized an opaque white glaze to hide the dark hue of European clay. Some European manufacturers of blue and white ware, particularly those in the Delft region of the Netherlands as well as parts of England, achieved a widespread popularity which continues into the 21st century.

Home of the Blue and White Porcelain, Jingdezhen

The major producer of blue-white porcelain is Jingdezhen, Jiangxi province of China. Since Song (960-1279) and Yuan (1271-1368) Dynasties, Jingdezhen had become the main producing area of Blue and White Porcelains.

blue and white porcelain

In 1979 Jingdezhen blue-white porcelain won a national golden prize and in 1985 it was honored with three gold medals at international fairs held in Leipzig, Brno, etc. Since then, the name “Jingdezhen Blue-white Porcelain” has spread far and wide. By far, it is a top product in the porcelain business, boasting the most prizes and highest standards.

The Blue and White Porcelain of unparalleled elegancy has not only been the rare curios appreciated by the nobility, high officials, scholars and the wealthy, but also has been the “emissary” of cultural exchanges between China and foreign countries. Since the 18th Century, China’s Blue and White Porcelain has been introduced to North-East Asia, South-East Asia, Mid-Asia, Europe and West Africa either through the sea or the Silk Road, and has become the art treasure shared and appreciated by the world. As time goes by, the collection value of Blue and White Porcelain is attracting more and more attention.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com  

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————–
Norman & Aileen, co-founded Interact China in 2004, specialize in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic people and Han Chinese. With direct partnership with artisans, designers, crafters and tailors, along with our professional team, plus 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bring you to your door finely selected aesthetic products, sourced across China, at reasonable price, in reliable quality, at great speed , with hearted service.
So far we carry 2000+ products covering 10 categories in Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Musical Instruments, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks, Painting Arts, Textile Arts and Carving Arts.
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P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

Tibetan Ornaments: Mystical Jewelry of Tibet

Tibetan ornaments are attractive with its complex patterns and special designs. Looking at Tibetan ornaments is like traveling back in time. The art itself has such a dreamlike effect. Tibetan ornaments seem to come with a little bit of the mysticism. Many of the Tibetan ornaments are worn for certain reasons and are believed to have the ability to bring the wearer good luck and success.

Material

The materials convey special meaning. Tibetan people prefer to choose materials which represent lucks to make Tibetan ornaments.

Bone

Tibetan Jewelry

In the view of Tibetan, yak is a holy animal which may carry good luck to their daily life. So the bone of yak is taken as the unique accessories. Tibetan people think they can get rid of misfortunes when carries this kind of ornaments.

Turquoise

Tibetan Jewelry

Turquoise is one of the world’s earliest-used gem materials. It has been revered for thousands of years. The turquoise used in these ornaments can be of various types too. Tibetan people think turquoise will bring success and good luck when carries it with blue diamond. It is also the symbol of richness and health when wearing it alone.

Organic gems

Red coral and amber, pearls are called organic gems. They represent people’s high social status and may bring good luck and health to the wearer.

Tibetan Jewelry

Coral is known to be used as a gem since prehistoric times. It is one of the seven treasures in Buddhist scriptures. Coral was thought to be a strong talisman against bleeding, evil spirits, and hurricanes. Its color ranges from white to red.

Tibetan Jewelry

Amber is fossilized pine tree resin, maple tree resin and other trees’ resin, which is ancient and valuable, like an antique from history. Although amber’s use in adornment is probably as old as mankind itself, in recent times it has had a limited market. Mila, one kind of Amber, was discovered in only in Tibet China currently. The Mila is the most precious amber, which has a long history of more than 100,000,000 years. Nowadays, there is little resource for Mila mine. And most of the Mila ambers are collected by the Buddhist.

Himalayan Beads

Tibetan Jewelry

In Tibetan language, the bead is called DZI which means happiness, power and wealth.

Pattern

The designs of Tibetan ornaments mostly derive from religious beliefs and the lifestyle of Tibetan people. Each pattern or color of the ornament carries a special meaning. For example, many of the Tibetan silver bracelets are carved with the six-syllable mantra (“Om Mani Padme Hum”), which in Tibetan Buddhism is believed to have the ability to eliminate disease, prolong life and increase wealth. Some pendants are in the design of Vajra, which in Buddhism is a ritual instrument for subduing demons, believed to dispel all sins and bring people power, courage, and intelligence. Amulets are often silver or bronze small boxes inlaid with pearls or precious stones and are used to contain clay or metal images of Buddha, Tibetan pills, Buddhist paintings or photos of a living Buddha. Another example is Tibetan opals, which fall into 12 categories according to the number of cat’s-eyes one contains, each representing a particular meaning. For example, a one-eye opal represents brightness and wisdom, and a two-eye opal represents harmonious marital relationship and happy family life.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com  

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————–
Norman & Aileen, co-founded Interact China in 2004, specialize in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic people and Han Chinese. With direct partnership with artisans, designers, crafters and tailors, along with our professional team, plus 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bring you to your door finely selected aesthetic products, sourced across China, at reasonable price, in reliable quality, at great speed , with hearted service.
So far we carry 2000+ products covering 10 categories in Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Musical Instruments, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks, Painting Arts, Textile Arts and Carving Arts.
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P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

Traditional Chinese Knots Become Modern Fashion

Chinese knot or Chinese traditional decorating knot is a folk handicraft. Appeared in ancient time, developed in Tang and song Dynasty and popularized in Ming and Qing Dynasty, Chinese knot has now become elegant and colorful arts and crafts from its original practical use.

Modern Chic

In China language, the pronunciation of the word “cord” or “sheng”, is similarly to the word “shen”(god).Thus, ancient Chinese made the dragon-shaped cord, as all Chinese considered themselves descendents of the dragon. The knot, or “jie” in Chinese, symbolizes strength and harmony. Many Chinese expressions formed by “jie” represent unity, closeness and comfort. All these favorable connotations made the Chinese knot a trendy item in China.

Modern Chic

The characteristic of Chinese knot is that the Chinese knot is knotted with a silk cord into traditional patterns with colorful tassels. It varies significantly in size, use and color. A typical Chinese knot is red, but it can also be gold, green or black. Flowers, birds, fish and insects are common patterns used in the Chinese knot, which derived auspicious meanings from related connotations, such as “Joy”, “Happiness and Longevity”, “Double Happiness”, “Luck and Auspiciousness As One Wishes” and “Have a nice trip”.

Modern Chic

People are drawn to traditional Chinese knots for different reasons. While many prefer to hang it on their doors to symbolize a joyous atmosphere, many young women like to use it as a fashion accessory to go with their fashionable clothing. The Chinese knot is also used to exchange best wishes among friends as well as to wish a safe journey.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com  

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————–
Norman & Aileen, co-founded Interact China in 2004, specialize in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic people and Han Chinese. With direct partnership with artisans, designers, crafters and tailors, along with our professional team, plus 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bring you to your door finely selected aesthetic products, sourced across China, at reasonable price, in reliable quality, at great speed , with hearted service.
So far we carry 2000+ products covering 10 categories in Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Musical Instruments, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks, Painting Arts, Textile Arts and Carving Arts.
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P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

Modern Chinese Dress

Traditional Chinese dress was profoundly elegant, extravagant and a prominent part of the culture of China. With the passage of time however Chinese dress has evolved into something new. Today’s Chinese dress use traditional elements implemented with contemporary styles in order to develop a revolutionary modernized Chinese dress.

Implementing traditional motifs with modern ideas

Chinese fashion designers have retained old school motifs. These include motifs that were popularly used in China such as abstract images of dragons, lions, opera masks and various other deities. The use of Chinese bronze is also prevalent amongst the modern day fashion designers. They use this to create printing, embroidery, woven and applied designs on clothes. Not only do the contemporary fashion designers make use of old school motifs, Chinese paintings are also used as patterns in the modern Chinese dress.

Modern Chic

Modern Chic Modern Chic

The modern dress according to the occasion

The modern dress varies according to the occasion. The men have a special refined version of the traditional Chinese gown as dignified attire to wear to social gatherings. For women there is a jazzed up version of the traditional dress wore during the Ching dynasty now known as Chipao.

Modern Chic Modern Chic

Experimenting with design

The basic structure of these dresses remains the same but fashion designers have a limitless variety when it comes to composing the cut for the collar, skirt and sleeves. Similarly they create designs where they experiment with the length, width and height of the gowns. And then you have the printed designs as well as the embroidery to work with.

The use of fashion accessories with the traditional Chinese dress has always been part of the Chinese culture. This practice is still pretty much present amongst the modern day Chinese with the only difference being that the fashion accessories too have evolved.

Modern Chic

The use of macramé is quite popular as a means of decorating the shoulders, seams, openings, belts, pockets and even hair ornaments and necklaces.

There are many profound examples of modernized fashion dresses such as the new age bridal tiara. This contemporary evolution shot off from a design that was popularized during the Sung Dynasty coupled with the style of embroidery that was popular in the Hunan Province. The Hunan style is particularly emphasized on the design of the sash. Fashion designers make use of traditional colors such as green, blue and most importantly red.

Such examples go to show how the age old traditional Chinese dresses have served as the basis of contemporary Chinese fashion. The new age Chinese dresses have gained popularity in non-Chinese cultures as well as they have a touch of elegance cut out to appeal to the modern masses.

Chinese people have largely adopted business suits, shirts and jeans as well. The designing of modern Chinese dresses is more of an art form and such dresses only come in use for special occasions like weddings and traditional celebrations

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com  

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————–
Norman & Aileen, co-founded Interact China in 2004, specialize in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic people and Han Chinese. With direct partnership with artisans, designers, crafters and tailors, along with our professional team, plus 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bring you to your door finely selected aesthetic products, sourced across China, at reasonable price, in reliable quality, at great speed , with hearted service.
So far we carry 2000+ products covering 10 categories in Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Musical Instruments, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks, Painting Arts, Textile Arts and Carving Arts.
—————————————————————————————

   

P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

Accessories and Motifs for Traditional Chinese Clothing

China is an ancient country with a very rich heritage. The thousands of years of history have laid a rich basis for the lives of its inhabitants today. While some of the ancient Chinese myths and cultural traditions have been forgotten or are no longer observed, many of them are still remembered and incorporated into everyday life. Taking a look into the cultural traditions of Chinese clothing can reveal a lot about the way that the people live.

One of the most interesting bits of Chinese can be found in what is known as the Jade Culture. Jade was a very fashionable emblem of ancient Chinese Culture. From very ancient times, during the Western Zhou Dynasty, jade has been used as a decoration that used to hang from the sash holding the Hanfu (a garment that was a part of the Ancient Chinese Clothing) closed. Jade was important in China not only because of its beauty, but also for its virtue and cultural significance. According to Confucius, jade had 11 virtues, some of which include beauty, purity and grace. Jade is of two types, soft jade, known as nephrite, which is native to China, and hard jade (jadeite) which was imported from Burma starting in the 1200′s.

Modern Chic

One of the most recognizable symbols of china is the dragon. A derivative of the serpent, it had a scaly body and five claws. It is a symbol of auspicious power and has been even Chinese Folklore. This symbol is very obviously found in Ancient Chinese Clothing particularly on imperial robes. The rulers considered themselves descendants of the dragon and so the scenes pertaining to dragons on their clothes were indicators of their power. Traditionally, the Chinese being an agriculture-based nation are very dependent on water. So, the dragon is associated with the weather and is the bringer of rain and water in China. The dragon is also the embodiment of the yang (male). The female counterpart is known as the Fenghuang (the phoenix)

Modern Chic

Some of the other popular motif designs are willow trees, chrysanthemums, cranes and bamboo. These are depicted on pottery, paintings, vases and of course clothes. Imagine owning a piece of Ancient Chinese Clothing complete with rich and elaborate patterns that once belonged to the rulers of this splendid civilization.

No Chinese object is complete without a depiction of at least one of the four favorite plants – the bamboo, the Chinese plum, chrysanthemum and orchid. Of these, the bamboo is used in the most versatile manner, from tableware – chopsticks and utensils – to flutes to paintbrushes and even hair accessories.

Modern Chic

Combs made of bamboo, ivory, jade and other materials further enhanced the ensemble of Ancient Chinese Clothing of women. Headgear in ancient times included hats for men and hairpieces for women. Traditionally, the Chinese wear their hats indoors as well as outdoors unlike their Western counterparts. This is mainly because most hats are too impractical to take off and carry around.

Modern Chic

Fashion of ancient China has constantly evolved through the various dynasties. For example, during the Sui Dynasty in the 500 AD, the emperor declared that only the rich people could wear colors while the poor people had to be dressed in blue or black.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————–
Norman & Aileen, co-founded Interact China in 2004, specialize in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic people and Han Chinese. With direct partnership with artisans, designers, crafters and tailors, along with our professional team, plus 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bring you direct finely selected aesthetic products, sourced across China, at reasonable price, in reliable quality, at great speed , with hearted service.

So far we carry 2000+ products covering 10 categories in Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Musical Instruments, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks, Painting Arts, Textile Arts and Carving Arts.
—————————————————————————————

P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

Jenny Ji’s Wedded Bliss

Recognised as one of China’s leading designers and influencers, Jenny Ji’s design philosophy blends Chinese chic with modern wit. Her designs feature elements of tradition tempered by intelligence and humour, resulting in a unique signature style.

After training at the Instituto Marangoni in Milan, Jenny Ji worked at Basic Krizia, Missoni Sport and D’A as a designer and visual director.

Modern Chic

Jenny Ji founded her eponymous label, La vie by Jenny Ji in 2002, a fashion and lifestyle brand that combines the essence of Chinese sophistication with contemporary tailoring. The brand resonates with the growing population of young, independent women.

Modern Chic

Since launching her own fashion label, many of Ji’s loyal followers have requested wedding dresses. “Actually, I don’t like most wedding gowns in China. Girls wear the same dresses with huge princess skirts and most brides look the same,” Ji says. “I finally said, ‘Okay, let me give this a try.’”

Modern Chic

Ji’s bridal line is marked with her signature touch – simple elegance and modern Chinese style. One gown that will be featured in a Shiseido cosmetics advertisement is classic white lace with a lavish red ribbon bow around the waist, draping down the gown’s modest train; while another dress has a cutout of the Chinese character for ‘double happiness’ on the lower back, adding a touch of both creativity and traditional auspiciousness.

Modern Chic

“A lot of brides come to us and they want too much for themselves. They want a dress that will make them look young, slim, perfect,” Ji says. “But I think girls have to remember, they’re not models and this should be the one time in your life that you should be the most like yourself.

“The most important thing is not the clothes. The dress cannot be more beautiful than the bride,” she adds.

One thing has led to another for Ji’s idea to delve into lingerie design, for example, wouldn’t have happened if she had not seen brides-to-be having difficulties finding lingerie to complement her gowns’ low backs and distinct shapes.

“There’s no designer lingerie,” says Ji, sorting through her laptop to show mock-ups of some of the 30 lingerie designs coming out in March. “A lot of my customers couldn’t find lingerie that wouldn’t change the shape of the dress. So we thought, why don’t we design wedding and honeymoon lingerie sets?”

On top of that, the La Vie lingerie collection will also include everyday wear and maternity fits. And perhaps, if she weren’t pregnant while working on this line, the latter and baby apparel wouldn’t have come to exist either. “It’s so difficult to find nice maternity lingerie. When you’re pregnant, you still want to be pretty, and not look ugly with a huge belly,” Ji says with a laugh.

East Meets West Becomes a Lifestyle fashion

Jenny Ji is a very strong proponent of “East meets West,” with modern collections that draw on cultural cues; For example, her 2010 “Blue Tiger Porcelain” collection, which took inspiration from Chinese porcelain. The classic style of “Old Shanghai” is a key element of all of her designs and a style guide that Jenny Ji constantly re-invents.

Modern Chic

Shanghaiist described her as a “soft-handed Vivienne Tam” and with a focus on being an ethical and eco-friendly designer, Jenny Ji is looking towards the future.

“We pick something traditional and use it in a modern way, make it more fashionable,” Ji says. “We’re proud of our history and culture, and we want to do something to remember them – not just put them away.”

Modern Chic

But don’t expect that Ji, who originally studied economics in hopes of becoming a teacher, will be making any qipaos. That just isn’t her style.

“For me, qipaos are too traditional and La Vie is about being modern. I don’t want to go the wrong way,” says Ji.

“I always say that fashion is something I can control. There are so many things you cannot control in your life, like your business, income or relationships. But fashion is something you can do for yourself and choose for yourself.”

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com

 

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————–

Norman & Aileen, co-founded Interact China in 2004, specialize in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic people and Han Chinese. With direct partnership with artisans, designers, crafters and tailors, along with our professional team, plus 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bring you direct finely selected aesthetic products, sourced across China, at reasonable price, in reliable quality, at great speed , with hearted service.

So far we carry 2000+ products covering 10 categories in Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Musical Instruments, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks, Painting Arts, Textile Arts and Carving Arts.

—————————————————————————————

P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!

If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

   

Seven Traditional Crafting Techniques for China Luxury Jewelry


1.Beijing Enamel

Also known as ‘silver enamel,’ this technology flourished during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). The Beijing Enamel process is typically used in silver jewelry-making, particularly in north China. Contemporary artists have taken up the Beijing Enamel process in recent years, managing to innovate by using it in new and interesting ways.

Beijing Enamel
Chinese Traditional Clothing


2.Cloisonné

Cloisonné, also known as ‘copper wire enamel,’ is one of the most famous traditional crafts of China. The style’s production techniques matured during the Ming Dynasty’s Jingtai period (1449–57 CE), and it typically incorporates blue enamel glaze. Hence it’s known in Chinese as Jingtai blue. Cloisonné is one of the top traditional exports of China, and was seen in the courts of emperors throughout the imperial period. Nowadays, Cloisonné is undergoing a period of transition as more designers are using it in more modern designs.

Cloisonné
Chinese Traditional Clothing


3. Jade carving

It is acknowledged by the world that jade carving is one of the oldest carving arts in China. Jade is a high-quality stone and has a good many variants. There are white jade, yellow jade, jasper, jadeite, agate, turquoise, etc. Jade carving refers to the process to carve a piece of jade into a fine article of art. A carving artist has to thoroughly examine a piece of jade, cudgel his brains to make a design according to its natural colors and shape, and turn it into an artistic work. Jade can be carved into human figures, containers, images of birds, animals flowers as well as small things like a brooch, ring, seal or decorative object.

Jade carving
Chinese Traditional Clothing


4. Filigree Inlaying

Filigree inlaying first appeared in China during the Shang Dynasty (1600–1046 BCE), and later became popular during the late Western Han Dynasty (206 BCE-220 CE). By the time of the Ming and Qing Dynasties, it had become one of the eight Yanjing traditional handicrafts. Today there are few craftsmen who work in filigree inlaying and the technique is in danger of fading away. However, with the famous Chinese jewelry and jade company Zhaoyi engaged in preservation initiatives, perhaps this traditional craft has a chance to live on and flourish in the years ahead.

Filigree Inlaying
Chinese Traditional Clothing


5. Engraving

Engraving as an art form has been around almost as long as Filigree Inlaying, having begun in the late Spring and Autumn Period and become popular during the Warring States period (475-221 BCE). Different engraving techniques were used over the years to decorate gold and silver with colorful patterns, peonies and chrysanthemums, fairies, unicorns, phoenixes and dragons in the traditional Chinese style..

Engraving
Chinese Traditional Clothing


6. Kingfisher Feather Ornamentation

As a traditional process in the creation of gold and silver jewelry production, due to the complexity of the process, the difficulty of preserving the finished product, and the use of kingfisher feathers — which is more difficult as environmental protection requirements become stricter — this traditional jewelry-making technique has almost been lost. The vast majority of examples of this type of ornamentation we see today have been handed down from the Qing Dynasty, since the technique really peaked during the Qianlong period (1735-1799 CE).

Kingfisher Feather Ornamentation
Chinese Traditional Clothing


7. Gold and Silver Threading

First appearing in the Shang and Zhou Dynasties and mainly used in the decoration of bronze vessels, over the course of history gold and silver threading gradually disappeared from the world stage as a result of the difficulty of the process. Today, though, some artisans are bringing this art form back to life, restoring thousands of years of lost time.

Gold and silver threading
Chinese Traditional Clothing

by Xiao Xiao @ InteractChina.com

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