Chinese Decor

If you’re looking to bring an eastern flair to your home decor, consider Chinese-style decorating. Elegant and beautiful in its exotic simplicity, Chinese-style decor creates an atmosphere of order and peace in a home without being boring or understated. A Chinese-style decor scheme is easy to achieve with the right combination of colors, fabrics, furnishings and just the right accents to bring it all together for a powerful yet sophisticated home.

 Chinese home decor

Features

Chinese decor features a simple backdrop with a few, strong dramatic punches to really pull a room together. Chinese style is generally minimalist, so getting rid of clutter is the order of business. Make good use of negative space by allowing each piece chosen to be featured rather than lost in a crowd. The pieces that are chosen for a room should help in maintaining the balance and harmony of the room, with a few placed prominently to make a bold statement.

 Chinese home decor

Palette

The main colors of the backdrop—the wall and the floor in particular—should be in natural, neutral shades: tans, creams, slates, muted grayish greens and brownish reds. This gives a rich but subtle canvass with which to work. Ground the room with splashes of black. Then choose a few featured areas to create focal points in the home. This is where you can introduce bright, vibrant, eye-catching colors. This may be a single red wall or large yellow lantern, or artwork featuring a mythological creature.

 Chinese home decor

Fabrics

Fabrics in a Chinese décor are often natural, so opt for hemp, cotton or wool. Silk can find a variety of uses in a Chinese-style home, be it in throw pillows or screens. Add interest by choosing fabrics that are embroidered with Asian-style designs or silk-screened with images such as flower blossoms or mythological figures. For the floor, oriental rugs add a nice touch.

 Chinese home decor

Furnishings

Low, solid, boxy shapes make good options for storage units or tables. Contemporary furnishings with strong but simple lines help promote the Asian feel to the room. Wood is a prime material, especially dark and highly polished woods such as teak or rosewood. Even if your furnishings aren’t specifically Asian style, you can redo them and add a Chinese flair to just about any solid minimalist contemporary furniture piece by painting it with black lacquer. Add ornate embellishments such as gold or brass handles to cabinet doors or some Asian-printed fabrics and cushions.

 Chinese home decor

Accents

Remember when you are striving for Chinese décor to think minimalist. Less is always more. Use fewer embellishments and accessories, but the ones you do use should make a powerful statement. Some more subtle accents would be orchids, embroidered pillows or cushions, or rice-paper lanterns. More outstanding works of art, such as sculptures or even wall murals, should pack a stronger punch with color and act as the room’s focal point. Use natural light as a design element as well by arranging the room so that natural window light features certain areas or accents.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

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“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
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Early bloomers in Chinese paintings

Chinese painters love nothing more than spring flowers when they depict spring scenes. Those early bloomers bring the first burst of color onto the drawing boards of a new year. Here is a list of spring flowers in Chinese paintings. You may find some fabulous scenes of spring, and you can just enjoy the pleasant season without going outdoors.

Canola plants

A painting of canola flowers by Shen Xinggong.
 Chinese Painting

Canola plants not only provide us with the world’s major source of vegetable oil, but also stunning spring scenes, when fields of canola flowers transfer the landscape into a huge golden blanket.

Peach blossoms

A painting of peach blossoms by Zhou Chunya.
 Chinese Painting

Peach blossoms are highly appreciated in Chinese culture. It is believed that the peach possesses more vitality than any other tree because its blossoms appear before leaves sprout.

Pear blossoms

A painting of pear blossoms by Yu Jigao.
 Chinese Painting

Beautiful things are often fleeting. Pear blossoms always seem to bloom in profusion overnight and are soon washed away by the rain before people realize they are there.

Cherry blossoms

A painting of cherry blossoms by Fang Chuxiong.
 Chinese Painting

Although the cherry blossom is part of the Japanese culture, the delicate pink flowers are enjoyed in most cities around the world.

Peony

A painting of peony by Yu Feian.
 Chinese Painting

Peony is the traditional flower symbol of China, and was formerly grown only for the Chinese emperor. The massive blooms are often associated with fortune, prosperity, and nobility.

Crabapple blossoms

A painting of crabapple blossoms by Zhang Shizeng.
 Chinese Painting

The famous traditional Chinese medicine doctor of the Tang Dynasty (AD 618-907), Sun Simiao, considered the blossom as an herbal medicine to resist some heart diseases.

Magnolias

A painting of magnolias by Huang Yongyu.
 Chinese Painting

Long-lived magnolia trees were loved by ancient Chinese royal families, and often planted in the temple.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————————————————–
“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
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Chinese Lantern Festival

The Lantern Festival (or Yuan Xiao Festival in Chinese) is a traditional Chinese festival with great significance, which is on the 15th of the first lunar month, marking the end of New Year celebrations. During the Lantern Festival, children go out at night carrying paper lanterns and solve riddles on the lanterns.

 Chinese Culture

Here are some things you should know about the Lantern Festival.

A sea of lanterns

 Chinese Culture

The biggest attraction of the Lantern Festival is the sea of lanterns in every conceivable size and shape. This is a festival for people to have fun. At night, people go into the streets with a variety of lanterns under the full moon and watch the lion or dragon dance, try to solve Chinese riddles and play games, enjoy typical food called Yuan Xiao and set off firecrackers. There is really a lot of fun for the young and the old.

Eating small dumpling balls

 Chinese Culture

Just as the name implies, an important part of the Lantern Festival, or Yuan Xiao Festival, is to eat small dumpling balls made of glutinous rice flour. We call these balls Yuan Xiao, or Tang Yuan. Obviously, they get the name from the festival itself. Made of sticky rice flour filled with sweet or salty stuffing and round in shape, the dumpling symbolizes family unity, completeness and happiness. Sweet fillings are made of sugar, walnuts, sesame, osmanthus flowers, rose petals, sweetened tangerine peel, bean paste or jujube paste. A single ingredient or any combination can be used as the filling. The salty variety is filled with minced meat, vegetables or a mixture of both.

Guessing lantern riddles

 Chinese Culture

When it comes to the Lantern Festival, “Guessing lantern riddles” is an essential component. Lantern owners will write riddles on a piece of paper and post them on the lanterns in advance. If visitors can answer the riddles, they can just pull the paper out and go to the lantern owners to check their answers. If they are right, they will get a little gift. The activity emerged during the Song Dynasty (960-1279). As riddle guessing is interesting and full of wisdom, it has become popular among all social strata.

Watching fireworks

 Chinese Culture

At night, in addition to magnificent lighted lanterns, fireworks form a grand scene. Most families save some fireworks from the Spring Festival and set them off during the Lantern Festival. Some local governments will even organize a fireworks party. On the night when the first full moon enters the New Year, people become really intoxicated by the imposing fireworks and bright moon in the sky.

Dragon dance

 Chinese Culture

The dragon dance, a form of traditional dance and performance in Chinese culture, is often seen in some festival celebrations. The dance is performed by a team of dancers who manipulate a long flexible figure of a dragon using poles positioned at regular intervals along the length of the dragon. The dance team mimics the supposed movements of this river spirit in a sinuous, undulating manner. Chinese dragons are a symbol of China, and they are believed to bring good luck to people, therefore the longer the dragon in the dance, the more luck it will bring to the community.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————————————————–
“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
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Tai Chi

Tai Chi Chuan (literally “Supreme Ultimate Fist”), often shortened to Taichi or Tai Chi in the West, is a type of internal Chinese martial art practiced for both its defense training and its health benefits. It is also believed that focusing the mind solely on the movements of the form helps to bring about a state of mental calm and clarity.

 Chinese Kungfu

Style

There are five major styles of tai chi chuan, each named after the Chinese family from which it originated. Most modern styles of Tai chi chuan trace their development to at least one of the five traditional schools: Chen, Yang, Wu/Hao, Wu, and Sun. Later dozens of new styles, hybrid styles, and offshoots of the main styles appear, but the five family schools are the groups recognized by the international community as being the orthodox styles.

Chen-style tai chi
 Chinese Kungfu
Yang-style tai chi
 Chinese Kungfu

Training and Techniques

The core training involves two primary features: the first being the solo form, a slow sequence of movements which emphasize a straight spine, abdominal breathing and a natural range of motion; the second being different styles of pushing hands with a partner and in a more practical manner.

 Chinese Kungfu

Study of Tai Chi Chuan

The study of tai chi chuan primarily involves three aspects:

Health: Tai chi’s health training concentrates on relieving the physical effects of stress on the body and mind. For those focused on tai chi’s martial application, good physical fitness is an important step towards effective self-defense.

Meditation: The focus and calmness cultivated by the meditative aspect of tai chi is seen as necessary in relieving stress and maintaining homeostasis.

Martial art: The ability to use tai chi as a form of self-defense in combat is the test of a student’s understanding of the art. Tai chi chuan is the study of appropriate change in response to outside forces, the study of yielding and “sticking” to an incoming attack rather than attempting to meet it with opposing force. The use of tai chi as a martial art is quite challenging and requires a great deal of training.

Modern Tai chi

Outdoor practice in Beijing
 Chinese Kungfu

With purely a health emphasis, tai chi classes have become popular in hospitals, clinics, and community and senior centers in the last twenty years and the art’s reputation as a low-stress training for seniors became better known.

Tai chi chuan in popular culture

 Chinese Culture

Tai chi chuan plays an important role in many martial arts and fighting action films and series, novels, as well as video games, trading cards games, etc. For example, Tai chi chuan have been featured in popular movies starring or choreographed by well-known martial arts competitors, such as Jet Li and Donnie Yen. Fictional portrayals often refer to Zhang San Feng, who is believed by these schools that Tai chi’s theories and practice was formulated by the Taoist monk in the 12th century.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————————————————–
“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
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Chinese Interior Design Elements

Chinese interior design elements lean toward the ornate and incorporate bold colors and intricate tapestries. But this ornate style can translate into fussy, overly accessorized rooms. By limiting design elements to a few basic pieces and accessories to two or three high-quality items, interiors remain simple and tranquil, in spite of the ornate pieces used.

Identification

 Chinese home decor

Large furniture pieces made of lacquered wood, with hand-carved detail, are identified with Chinese interior design. Recognizable features include wall murals depicting animals such as fish, dragons, birds or monkeys or mythological figures.

Colors

 Chinese home decor

Red is a signature color in Chinese decorating style and is a symbol of good luck. Other frequently used colors include green, blue and yellow.

Features

 Chinese home decor

While accessories in Chinese interior design are few and select, screens, ivory, Chinese pottery, bamboo, pillows and ornate rugs are frequently featured. Popular materials include wood with metal inlays and bamboo.

Misconceptions

Chinese interior design elements should not be confused with Japanese style. Japanese style tends to be simpler and draws on natural elements such as plants, silks and water features.

Furniture

 Chinese home decor

In addition to ornate furnishings, many classic Chinese pieces will offer clean lines and a simplistic style. Chinese elm finishes, as well as red or black lacquered pieces, are popular.

Considerations

The art of feng shui is another prominent practice in Chinese interior design. Feng shui philosophy is a belief that the objects in a home and the way that they are arranged will affect the health, prosperity and well-being of the person living there.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————————————————–
“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
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P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

Traditional Chinese Spring Festival customs

Spring Festival, which falls on the 1st day of the 1st lunar month according to Chinese lunar calendar, is the most important festival in China and a time for family reunion, like Christmas in the West.

Traditionally, Spring Festival starts in the early days of the 12th month of the lunar calendar and lasts until the middle of the 1st lunar month of the following year. With the modernization of China, some traditional customs are still followed today, but others have fallen by the wayside.

Here are some customs that traditionally celebrate the Spring Festival.

 Chinese Culture

Little New Year, which falls the 23rd day of the 12th month in the Lunar calendar, is also known as the Festival of the Kitchen God, the deity who oversees the moral character of each household.People make sacrifices to the Kitchen Gold on this day.

 Chinese Culture

Families undertake thorough house cleaning on the 24th day of the 12th month in the Lunar calendar, sweeping out the old in preparation for the coming year.

 Chinese Culture

After people have cleaned the house and started preparing food, they begin decorating their homes creating an atmosphere of rejoicing and festivity on the 28th day of the 12th month in the Lunar Calendar. Decorations include spring couplets, New Year pictures, posters of door gods and paper-cuts.

 Chinese Culture

On the 29th day of the 12th lunar month people visit the graves of their ancestors to honor their memory. It is said Spring Festival originated in the Shang Dynasty (c. 1600 BC-c. 1100 BC) from the people’s sacrifice to gods and ancestors at the end of an old year and the start of a new one.

 Chinese Culture

Chinese people are supposed to stay up the whole night on the 30th day of the 12th month in the Lunar Calendar.

In Chinese mythology, a monster called nian would come out to harm people on New Year’s Eve, so people get together, staying up and chatting, hoping for a peaceful passage of time. The custom of staying up symbolizes the warding off of all diseases and disasters and wishing good luck in the New Year.

Chinese people attach great importance to the Spring Festival Eve, when all family members eat dinner together.

 Chinese Culture

The first day of Chinese New Year, also known as the “day of chicken”, officially begins at midnight.

It is traditional to light firecrackers and make as much of a din as possible to chase off the evil monster nian.

Most importantly the oldest and most senior members are visited with the visits strengthening family kinship.

Senior members of the family hand out red envelopes containing cash (Chinese: ya sui qian), a form of blessing and to suppress aging and the challenges of the coming year, to junior members of the family, mostly children and teenagers.

On the second day, married daughters usually go back to their own family to visit parents, relatives and close friends.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————————————————–
“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
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Twelve Beauties (2)

A Beauty at Leisure: Distant Thoughts among Antiquities
 Chinese Painting

Sitting on the mottled bamboo chair, this lady glances down, absorbed by her private thoughts. She is surrounded by an array of treasures displayed on shelves including fine ceramics. For example, behind her is a Ru ware style brush washer, and a jade table screen; to her left (our right) is a red-glazed monks-cap ewer, and a bronze zun wine beaker. All identifiable as objects from the Kangxi and Yongzheng periods, these objects present the quintessential opulent style of the imperial household. These treasures not only add credibility to the authenticity of the scene, they also are used to convey the woman’s interest in antiquities.

A Beauty at Leisure: Watching Magpies from a Couch
 Chinese Painting

Seated indoors on a couch and playing with a jade interlink, this lady is lost in thought while watching the pair of magpies that are calling outside. The artist means to show the woman’s happiness at the end of winter and the beginning of spring, but he also, perhaps inadvertently, conveys a sense of stifling solitude and utter loneliness that was the lot of many women in the palace. The screen behind her is inscribed with hundreds of different forms of the character for longevity. Although the message is to extend life hundreds of years, one feels she would willing trade the life of an immortal for the devoted pairing of Mandarin ducks.

A Beauty at Leisure: Sitting Beside a Chrysanthemum
 Chinese Painting

Sitting next to a table in a study, this woman holds a fine enamel watch. On the table stands a vase with chrysanthemums, which indicates that the time is the eighth lunar month (early autumn). Elegant and lofty, the chrysanthemum is much appreciated in the autumn for its ability to resist the cold. Endowed with a hearty nature, it was associated with firm resolution and longevity, and was also appreciated for its simple beauty and refinement. It became the favored ornament to adorn both hair and rooms in the house. Behind her is hanging a scroll with a poem by the great Ming dynasty calligrapher Dong Qichang (1555-1636). The European astrolabe on the small table in the next room and the enamel watch that the woman holds in her hand are indications that Western objects were already becoming fashionable in the palace.

A Beauty at Leisure: Watching Cats while Handling Beads
 Chinese Painting

Sitting upright, slightly leaning on the table, and leisurely handling the prayer beads, this lady is watching two cats play on a windowsill. The painter has us view the interior of the room from outside the round window, so the focal interest in this painting is relatively small, but because the painter used western one-point perspective, the foreground, middle ground, and background are laid out systematically, which has the result of significantly expanding the sense of space and also extending the charm of the scene. The chime clock next to the lattice window is marking the passage of time as the cats play on the threshold of inner and outer space. In an ambiance of suspended activity, the days thus pass quietly.

A Beauty at Leisure: Wearing a fur-lined coat, Looking in a Mirror
 Chinese Painting

Wearing a fur-lined surcoat, and with jade adorning her wrist, the lady in this painting holds a bronze mirror in one hand, while warming the other by gently resting it on a brazier. In the background, there is a hanging scroll inscribed by Hermit Pochen. Pochen (literally “defeating the dust of the world”) was the sobriquet that the Yongzheng emperor had adopted when he was still a prince. It implies that he aimed to be pure of heart and had few desires.

A Beauty at Leisure: Watching Snow Beside a Brazier
 Chinese Painting

Gently holding back a curtain, a lady sits on a bed beside the window and admires the snowy scene and blossoming plum tree. Covered with frost and snow, the jade-green bamboo looks strong and fresh despite the cold. Celebrated in poetry for its life force (it blossoms in late winter before the snow has melted), the white winter sweet is favored not only for its beauty but also because the five petals of its blossom are associated with five blessings including happiness, good fortune, health, auspiciousness, and longevity.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————————————————–
“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
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P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!