Oriental Wall Decor

If you’re going for an oriental theme in your home or in a room, wall decor will certainly enhance the tone.

Rattan Scrolls

 Chinese home design

Rattan scrolls are artistic designs that are painted on a special paper or silk. These scrolls are very popular as collectibles and home decorative items in Asian countries. The scrolls are usually weighted down with a dowel at the bottom to keep the artwork crisp and clear for display. Rattan scrolls are a great wall decor to enhance the oriental culture in your room.

Wall Decals

 Chinese home design

Oriental wall decals are a great way to add some life to your room. Unlike using big framed pictures, rattan scrolls and other forms of decor that you hang on the wall, decals take up less room and feel less bulky. Unfortunately, wall decals limit your ability to change things up if you decide you want to adjust the decor. Wall decals are definitely more permanent than something you hang on the wall, which you can simply move around when you please. So be prudent when deciding how you want to use wall decals.

Oriental Wall Fans

 Chinese home design

A classic home decorative item in Asian custom is the Oriental Wall Fans. The creation of oriental fans has a history of two thousand years in ancient China as a medium for artistic expression. They have become a popular collectible item and home decoration. Oriental wall fans come in a wide variety of styles and designs.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————————————————–
“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
—————————————————————————————————————————–

P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

Hairpins in Chinese Culture

 Ladies Fashion

Hairpins are an important symbol in Chinese culture. In ancient China, hairpins were worn by all genders, and they were essential items for everyday hairstyling, mainly for securing and decorating a hair bun. Furthermore, hairpins worn by women could also represent their social status.

 Ladies Fashion

In Han Chinese culture, when young girls reached the age of fifteen, they were allowed to take part in a rite of passage known as “Ji Li”, or “hairpin initiation” . This ceremony marks the coming of age of young women. Particularly, before the age of fifteen, girls did not use hairpins as they wore their hair in braids, and they were considered as children. When they turned fifteen, they could be considered as young women after the ceremony, and they started to style their hair as buns secured and embellished by hairpins. This practice indicated these young women may now enter into marriage. However, if a young woman hadn’t been consented to marriage before age twenty, or she hadn’t yet participated in a coming of age ceremony, she must attend a ceremony when she turned twenty.

 Ladies Fashion

In comparison with “Ji Li”, the male equivalent known as “guan li” or “hat initiation”, usually took place five years later, at the age of twenty. In the 21st century Hanfu Movement, an attempt to revive the traditional Han Chinese coming-of-age ceremonies has been made, and the ideal age to attend the ceremony is twenty years old for all genders.

 Ladies Fashion

While hairpins can symbolize the transition from childhood to adulthood, they were closely connected to the concept of marriage as well. At the time of an engagement, the fiancée may take a hairpin from her hair and give it to her fiancé as a pledge: this can be seen as a reversal of the Western tradition, such as the future groom presents an engagement ring to his betrothed. After the wedding ceremony, the husband should put the hairpin back into his spouse’s hair.

 Ladies Fashion

Hair has always carried many psychological, philosophical, romantic, and cultural meanings in Chinese culture. In Han ethnicity, people call the union between two people “jie-fa”, literally means “tying hair”. During the wedding ceremony, some Chinese couples exchange a lock of hair as a pledge, while others break a hairpin into two parts, and then, each of the betrothed take one part with them for keeping. If this couple ever get separated in the future, when they reunite, they can piece the two halves together, and this completed hairpin will serve as a proof of their identities as well as a symbol of their reunion. In addition, a married heterosexual couple is sometimes referred to as “jie-fa fu-qi”, an idiom which implies the relationship between the pair is very intimate and happy, just like how their hair has been tied together.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————————————————–
“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
—————————————————————————————————————————–

P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

Oriental Home Decor – Chinese Traditional Home Décor

The most popular decorating style these days seems to be Oriental designs. One particular Oriental design which many people love is the traditional Chinese interior. Chinese style tends to be bold and beautiful.

 Chinese home design

Bright, vivid colors are used in oriental style decorating, with red, gold and black being dominant. Gold or multi-colored dragons against a red, white or black background are common.

 Chinese home design

Asian-styled furniture is very often crafted from teak wood, and is usually based on the Buddhist principles of living simply and in harmony with one’s surroundings. Asian home furniture is a blend of form and function, where art and design are intended to be both beautiful and purposeful.

Chinese rosewood furniture
 Chinese home design

Furniture, such as chairs, tables and room dividing screens are frequently made from bamboo and rosewood. Highly lacquered, shiny wood furniture is also common with this type of decor. Oriental decor and furniture are often adorned with motifs that depict natural and cultural scenes which are meaningful in Buddhist and Confucian inspired societies.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————————————————–
“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
—————————————————————————————————————————–

P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

Sichuan Brocade: High-end custom-made gift from the oriental "Brocade City"

Sichuan Brocade, from China’s western metropolis of Chengdu, is one of the representatives of Chinese silk. In recent years, during the International Milan Fashion Week or fashion weeks in Paris, London and New York , you have seen fashion shows with a variety of Chinese silk fabric designed by both Chinese and foreign designers, and they even caused a Chinese style sensation.

In the Milan World Expo’s China Pavilion, the visitors can feel the charm of brocade. The tough, colorful fabric is made with multi-colored silk. Lifelike crane, flowers, fish and animals are woven by hands instead of being printed on silk fabrics. According to historical records, this manual process is a heritage with 2,000 years’ history.

Detail of the Qing Dynasty Sichuan brocade
 Chinese culture

Dating back about 1,800 years ago and during the Three Kingdoms period, Sichuan Brocade was quite popular as Chengdu was the starting point of the “Silk Road”. Sichuan Brocade was highly developed as an important national industry, and was an important diplomatic gift. To promote brocade industry, Chengdu established a specialized palace for craftsman and workshops for better management. Chengdu therefore is also known as “the city of brocade”, and the river running through the city and is also known as “the river of brocade.”

 Chinese culture

Just as the world-famous Italian clothing and shoes handmade craftsmanship, Sichuan Brocade also has a tedious making process. According to brocade craftsman, one centimeter Sichuan Brocade takes picks of 120 times. Even the most skilled weavers could only make less than 10 centimeters tapestry one day.

Weaver picks and sorts out the silk on the traditional loom
 Chinese culture

Difficult production and superb artistry endow hand-woven brocade with a high collection value and make it a luxury for ancient Chinese nobility. Italy was the end of the ancient “Silk Road” and Chengdu was the supply of goods. You can imagine that 1000 years ago, Sichuan Brocade with high-end custom-made design might also be popular among the Roman nobility.

In the near future, as the culture exchange between China and Europe become increasingly frequent, the “Chinese Fashion” with Sichuan Brocade will be used more in hand-made dress production and appear on the Milan Fashion Week and other international stages. The magical fabric from the East will shine brightly.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————————————————–
“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
—————————————————————————————————————————–

P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

Dudou, the artistic underwear of ancient China

“Dudou”, or bellyband, is a piece of cloth that covers one’s belly. It dates back thousands of years. It was used by Chinese women as an undergarment in ancient times and can be considered China’s most original underwear.

“Red Underwear”, a painting by Liushi Zong
 Chinese clothing

Origin

Dudou was invented by the Chinese somewhen in the 17th century with the sole practical purpose to keep the chest and stomach area warm. It is just a square or rhomboidal piece of cloth with attached straps that were tied around the neck and at the back. It was worn by children, women and men alike to prevent not only cold but, according to some sources, diarrhea as well.

Dudou, early 20th century. The National Museum of Taiwan History
 Chinese clothing

Patterns

“White Rabbit and Fuwa”. This embroidery theme is a symbol of life and fertility
 Chinese clothing

This simple garment worn underneath, however, artistically decorated with embroidery. The embroidery served not just as mere decoration, each figure or pattern had a special meaning. The patterns’ subjects depended on who the dudou was intended for. Those for lovers obviously had love as their theme: romantic stories taken from operas, myths and folklore; those for young women and brides could contain figures of dragon, phoenix and fish as symbols of good luck, happiness and fertility; the patterns used for the bellybands of babies and children often had tiger as their main character who was believed to give protection against evil; dudous for older people could be embroidered with images of tortoise, a symbol of longevity.

Materials

Dudou, late Qing dynasty, satin, silver chain. Embroidery depicts “both husband and wife around the house” story. China National Silk Museum
 Chinese clothing

Traditional dudous were mostly made of silk satin. The straps could be of the same fabric or cotton but those from rich families used gold or silver chains instead.

 Chinese clothing

In recent years the dudou has made a come back, as a fashion item as well as an underwear. Nowadays there are different designs of dudou on the Chinese market that can be worn in the streets as a backless top combined with skirts or jeans or at home as a sexy lingerie.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————————————————–
“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
—————————————————————————————————————————–

P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

What is the Asian Style of Decorating?

Asian decorating usually refers to either Chinese or Japanese styles. These two Asian styles differ greatly. Japanese decor is traditionally very soothing and minimalist, while Chinese decor can be very dramatic and detailed.

Japanese décor
 Asian style home decor

The Chinese type of Asian decorating is known for its bright colors, especially red. Red is considered a lucky color and you can even paint wood red to get the Chinese look in your home. Other possible color choices for a Chinese type of Asian decorating scheme may be Chinese blue or yellow.

Chinese décor
 Asian style home decor

Dark woods are often featured in Chinese decor and they make a great contrast to any bright color used. Carvings and animal figures are common Chinese accent pieces and Chinese artwork is a must to get an authentic Asian style of decorating. Murals in which a whole wall is painted in a dramatic scene are a very traditional Chinese decorating look. An easy way to create the look of the Chinese type of Asian decorating scheme in your home is to pick one bright accent color and keep all your wood tones dark to contrast that color. Next, add at least five or six fairly large pieces of Chinese art to the room. You could add silk pillows or curtains in your accent color and/or other colors if you need more drama in the room.

Chinese décor
 Asian style home decor

The Japanese type of Asian decorating is based on natural, earthy colors. Natural light is a big part of Japanese design, so this look may work especially well in a room that gets a lot of sunlight. Tatami mats, rice paper, plants and flowers provide most of the accents in the very sparse look that is traditional Japanese decor. The absence of bright color and clutter creates a calming atmosphere.

Japanese décor
 Asian style home decor

Floor pillows and tatami mats can help you start the Japanese type of Asian decorating scheme in your home. Furniture should be minimal and low to the floor. Rice paper screens and lamp shades offer a realistic Japanese touch. A few bonsai plants and a Japanese tea set placed on a table can add a lot of interest while still keeping in with the overall sense of serenity.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————————————————–
“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
—————————————————————————————————————————–

P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

Traditional Chinese Dragon Boat Festival

The Duanwu or Dragon Boat Festival, which is celebrated on the fifth day of the fifth month of the Chinese lunar calendar, falls on June 20 this year. It is one of the oldest festivals, not only in China but also throughout the world, with a history of more than 2,000 years.

Poet Qu Yuan in a painting.
 Chinese Culture

The Dragon Boat Festival commemorates the death of Qu Yuan, a patriot poet during the Warring States Period (475-221 BC), who committed suicide by flinging himself into the Miluo River in Central China’s Hunan province after his mother kingdom fell into enemy rule.

Legend holds that people in boats raced to the site where he drowned and threw in zongzi (glutinous rice wrapped in reed leaves) so fish wouldn’t feed on Qu’s body.

Since then, the fifth day of the fifth month on the lunar calendar is celebrated as the Dragon Boat Festival. People hold boat races and prepare zongzi in memory of Qu’s righteousness and his beautiful poems.

1. Eating Zongzi

Different varieties of zongzi tempt the palate.
 Chinese Culture

Also called glutinous rice dumpling wrapped in reed or bamboo leaves, zongzi is an essential Dragon Boat Festival food, but tastes vary between the north and south of China.

In the north people favor sweet zongzi and jujube is used as a filling, while in the south zongzi takes different shapes and various fillings, such as fresh meat, egg yolk, sweetened bean paste or ham.

2. Dragon boat racing

Competitors row a dragon boat during a race in East China’s Anhui Province.
 Chinese Culture

Dragon boat racing is an indispensable part of the festival with the boats so named because the fore and stern are in the shape of a Chinese dragon.

Legend has it that the race originates from the idea that people rowed boats to seek Qu Yuan’s body after he drowned.

3. Hanging auspicious leaves

People hang mugwort leaves and calamus on doors and windows to repel insects and moths.
 Chinese Culture

It is said that the fifth lunar month is considered a “poisonous” one in the Chinese farmer’s almanac because insects and pests are active and it is also high season for people catching infectious diseases.

During the Dragon Boat Festival people in southern China put mugwort leaves and calamus on the doors or windows to keep insects out of their homes. The leaves are believed to have curative properties.

4. Wearing scented sachets and five-color silk thread

A child with scented sachets.
 Chinese Culture

In the north, people believe that wearing scented sachets protects children from evil. The young decorate their clothes with small pouches made from colorful silk cloth with five-color silk thread.

Another custom is to tie thread around a child’s wrists, ankles and neck. Five-color thread holds special significance in China in that it is thought to contain magical and healing properties. Children are not permitted to speak while parents tie the thread for them, neither are they allowed to remove it until after the first summer rainfall when they throw the thread into the river. This is thought to protect them from plague and disease.

by Xiao Xiao xiaoxiao@interactchina.com    

About Interact China

—————————————————————————————————————————–
“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide”

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 2000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Tailor Shop, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.
—————————————————————————————————————————–

P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!
If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!