Chinese Shoe Culture(IV)The Multi-Layer Sole

The craft of multi-layer-sole cloth shoes was a remarkable achievement in Chinese shoe making history, carrying tremendous history, culture and craft value. It has been listed on China’s second intangible cultural heritage list since 2008. The shoe sole is made of many layers of cloth stitched together under fine processes.

The earliest shoes with sewn soles began in the Zhou dynasty. According to archeological research, these stitched soles were first used in the army because of the requirement for abrasion-resistant shoes. Then, these shoes with sewn soles become popular among the public. This was the first time that friction theory was used in shoe design in China.

4 multilayer shoes.jpeg

In the Qing dynasty, sewn sole shoes evolved into multi-layer-sole shoes which is famous around the world. There is a set of strict procedures for the making of multi-layer-sole shoes. The shoes are good at heat releasing in summer, and can keep feet warm in winter. The modern multi-layer-sole shoes are quite different from the traditional ones. Whether in design or in material, modern multi-layer shoes align with the current aesthetic trend of returning to nature.

4 内联升大鱼海棠系列女鞋.jpgNeiLianSheng Women’s Shoes Series with Big Fish and Begonia Design

(NeiLianSheng is a brand)

4 内联升西瓜圆口布鞋.pngNeiLianSheng’s Watermelon Round-Opening Sewn Shoes

4 内联升千彩女鞋.jpgNeiLianSheng’s Colorful Women’s Shoes

4 内联升织锦婚鞋.pngNeiLianSheng’s Brocade Wedding Shoes

4 内联升蓝印花布方口女鞋.jpgNeiLianSheng’s Indigo Printed Square-Opening Women’s Shoes

4 内联升花卉女鞋.jpgNeiLianSheng’s Floral Women’s Shoes

4 内联升纯手工僧侣凉鞋.jpgNeiLianSheng’s Handmade Monk Sandals

4 内联升锦衣卫手绘工作鞋.jpgNeiLianSheng’s Imperial Guards’ Working Shoes

About Interact China


“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide” 

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 3000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Kungfu Clothing, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.


P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!

If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

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Chinese Shoe Culture(V)Colorful Tribal Shoes

The vast and fertile land of China gives birth to multi-ethnic cultures. Footwear also shows astonishing changes with civilizations from different geographical circumstances.

5满族黑贡呢云纹双梁花鞋.jpgManchu Black Tribute Flower Shoes with Double Beams · The Late Qing Dynasty and Early Period of the Republic of China

Manchu women wore flag shoes, and Manchu men wore boots. Most of the flag shoes were embedded with double beams, but some were sewed in cloud patterns with brocade, called “cloud shoes”. Manchu women’s shoes were divided into flat sole types and high sole types. Some of the high-sole shoes had the design of a “horse hoof”.

5藏族红黑毛呢绣花长靴.jpgTibetan Thigh Wool Boots with Red and Black Embroidery · Contemporary

There are many kinds of Tibetan boots, which can be roughly divided into 3 types: cow leather boots, corduroy boots, and woolen cotton boots. However, there is no difference between men and women’s boots. They were only different in height and thickness.

5侗族挽针绣翘头绣花鞋.jpgDong Tribe’s Warped Head Shoes with Double Chain Stitch Embroidery · Contemporary.

5侗族马尾绣翘头绣花鞋.jpgDong Tribe’s Warped Head Shoes with Horsetail Embroidery · Contemporary

The Dong tribe’s embroidered warped head shoes, also called “hook shoes,” had a pointed end like a ship’s bow or an ox’s horn, a symbol that payed respect to nature and animals. Many Chinese ethnic groups make symmetrical shoes. This simplifies the shoe-making process, and also reduces the difference in abrasion between the two sides caused by constant wearing.

5鄂温克族犴皮靴.jpgEwenki Tribe’s Dog Skin Boots · Contemporary

Before the late Qing dynasty, the Ewenki people made all their clothes from animal skin, as they lived in a cold region and made use of animal husbandry. Their hide boots were warm, portable, and resilient. Walking with Ewenkian hide boots in snow and in mountains made only tiny sounds, which was helpful for hunting.

5鄂温克族犴腿皮靴.jpgEwenki Tribe’s Dog Skin Boots · Contemporary

Ewenki people wear dog skin boots all year round. Generally the summer’s boots are hairless. In winter, people put wula grass, one of the three treasures of Dongbei province, in their shoes to keep their feet warm.

5青海互助土族绣花鞋.jpgEmbroidered Shoes of Tu Ethnic Group in Qinghai Province · Contemporary

5青海互助土族腰鞋.jpgThigh Boots of Tu Ethnic Group in Qinghai Province · Contemporary

Tu embroidery features delicate stitches, vibrant colors, compact woven structures, and is easy to preserve. Patterns on these shoes are mainly made by simple stiches using bright colors, and show the unique artistic attraction of the Tu people’s embroidery. Rainbow-patterned decoration is usually on Tu women’s clothing, and therefore the ethnic area in Qinghai province is known as the “rainbow town”.

5四川茂汶羌族花鞋.jpgEmbroidered Shoes and Hand-sewn Soles of Maowen Qiang Ethnic Group in Sichuan Province · Contemporary

The cloud shoes, often with embroidered soles, are homemade cotton shoes which the Qiang people wear on holidays. The shoes represent love in Qiang’s traditions.

5赫哲族鱼皮鞋.jpgFish Leather Shoes of the Hezhen Ethnic Group · Contemporary

The Hezhen ethnic group lives along the Songhua River, earning their livelihoods by fishing and hunting. Using fish skin to make clothing, including jackets, pants, bags, and shoes, is the Hezhen ethnic group’s distinct traditional skill.

5白族女花鞋.jpgEmbroidered Shoes of Bai Ethnic Group · Contemporary

Ladies from the Bai tribe also have handmade shoe traditions.

5保安族黑贡缎刺绣女夹袜.jpgBlack Sateen Embroidered Women’s Socks from Baoan Ethnic Group · Contemporary

The Baoan ethnic group’s traditional “shoe-socks,” also known as “worship shoes,” are usually taken off in mosques. Since the bottom of the socks are the hells are shown during worship service, the Baoan people sewed exquisite flower patterns to the bottom of the heel of the “shoe-socks.”

As we can see, there are countless achievements of Chinese handcrafted art.

 

About Interact China


“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide” 

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 3000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Kungfu Clothing, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.


P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!

If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

Chinese Shoe Culture (VI) The Spirit Under Foot

In northern China, children often wear animal shoes. These animal shoes are a traditional type of embroidery made using the applique technique, where cotton, linen, and other materials are stitched into a variety of patterns.

Women found that children’s shoes were particularly vulnerable to breaking, so they cut clothes into many animal prints and sewed them on the shoes. This not only increased the wear resistance of children’s shoes but also made them have a very interesting aesthetic.

6虎纹婴儿靴 民国.jpgTiger Head Baby Boots · Republic of China

6虎纹婴儿鞋 民国.jpg

6虎纹婴儿鞋 民国2.jpgTiger Head Baby Shoes · Republic of China

Chinese people devote a particular care to wearing shoes. They traditionally believed that wearing tiger head or lion head shoes could dispel evil spirits and bring peace, as tigers and lions are the kings of animals.

6狮子纹童鞋  民国.pngChildren’s Lion Shoes · Republic of China

 6狮子纹婴儿鞋 民国.jpgBaby’s Lion Shoes · Republic of China

6平针绣狮子纹婴儿连脚裤 民国.jpgBaby’s Plain-stitched Lion Pattern Pantyhose · Republic of China

6猪纹婴儿鞋 民国.jpgBaby’s Pig Shoes · Republic of China

 These pig shoes carry parents’ best wishes for their babies to be healthy and grow strong, as pigs both eat well and sleep well.

6龙纹带须婴儿靴 民国.jpgBaby’s Dragon Boots · Republic of China

The dragon, an auspicious totem in Chinese culture, is a popular design in Chinese clothing and adornments.

6猫头鞋 民国.jpgBaby’s Cat Shoes · Republic of China

6兔紋婴儿鞋 民国2.jpg

6兔紋婴儿鞋 民国.jpgBaby’s Rabbit Shoes · Republic of China

Sewing animals on her children’s shoes not only shows a women’s gratitude for nature, but also expresses good wishes for her children’s feature, hoping they grow up to resemble these lovely spiritual animals.

About Interact China


“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide” 

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 3000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Kungfu Clothing, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.


P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!

If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

 

 

Chinese Shoe Culture (III) Amazing Women’s Shoes of the Qing Dynasty

Handcrafted embroidery is one of China’s finest skills. It has a long history, and has become a respected tradition. This skill was significantly developed in the Qing dynasty. There were a number of traditional methods of stitching. The Suzhou, Hunan, Shu, and Yue types of stitches were known as the four most famous Chinese stitches. These four embroidery methods had a great influence on the embroidered shoes in the Qing dynasty.

 3 19世纪橙色地福寿纹绣花鞋 关键词-清代弓鞋;小脚鞋;三寸金.jpgOrange Embroidered Shoes for Bithday Celebration

3 标题-清代粉地绣花小脚鞋 关键词-清代弓鞋;小脚鞋;三寸金莲;.jpgPink Embroidered Bow Shoes

3 标题-清代黑色绣花底鞋 关键词-清代弓鞋;.jpgBlack Sole Embroidered Shoes

According to historical research, the Chinese foot binding tradition began at the end of the Five Dynasties period. It became popular during the Ming dynasty, the Qing dynasty, and the period of the Republic of China. The foot binding practice reached its peak in the Qing dynasty. Han Chinese women from every social class were expected to bind their feet. Little feet were widely appreciated in that time.

3 标题-清代花卉纹三寸金莲小脚鞋 关键词-清代弓鞋;小脚鞋;三寸金莲;花卉纹;.jpgFlower Embroidered Bow Shoes

3 标题-清代粉地绣花鞋 关键词-清代弓鞋;.jpgPink Embroidered Shoes

3 标题-19世纪紫地花卉纹绣花鞋 关键词-清代弓鞋;小脚鞋;.jpgPurple Flower Embroidered Shoes

3 标题-19世纪黑地花卉蝙蝠纹刺绣弓鞋 关键词-清代弓鞋;小脚鞋;三寸金莲;花卉纹;蝙蝠纹; 通用描述-清代弓鞋;.jpgBlack Bats and Flowers Embroidered Bow Shoes

3 标题-19世纪红地蝴蝶纹绣花弓鞋 关键词-清代弓鞋;.jpgRed Butterflies Embroidered Bow Shoes

The history of bound-feet shoes, also called “bow shoes”, is said to be a history of blood and tears for the Han Chinese women. These fancy looking shoes reflected the harsh foot binding ideology that was prevalent in China’s feudal society.

3 清末粉地花卉纹“三寸金莲”高跟,一般见客时套在小脚鞋上,以增加鞋的高度,该类脚跟的使用不太普遍。面料是粉红刺绣花卉纹缎.jpgPink floral high heels

3 清代蓝地花草纹弓靴  标题-清代蓝地花草纹弓靴 关键词-清代弓鞋;小脚鞋;三寸金莲;花草纹.jpgBlue Bottom Floral Bow Shoes

3 标题-19世纪红地盘金绣弓鞋 关键词-清代弓鞋;小脚鞋;三寸金.jpgRed and Gold Thread Embroidered Bow Shoes

3 标题-19世纪花卉纹刺绣高跟小脚鞋 关键词-清代弓鞋;高跟小脚鞋;三寸金莲;花卉纹; 通用描述-清代弓鞋;.jpgFloral Embroidered High-Heeled Bow Shoes

Manchu women, however, didn’t have the foot-binding habit. Therefore their shoes were much larger than the Han Chinese women’s shoes.

3 清代满族蓝缎地梅花纹绣花鞋.jpgBlue Satin Manchu Embroidered Shoes with Plum Blossoms

3 清代满族浅粉地暗八仙.jpgManchu Women’s Light Pink Embroidered Shoes with Eight Immortals Design

3 清光绪 红色缎绣金鱼纹元宝底女棉鞋.jpgRed Silk Cotton-Padded Shoes with Golden Fish Design

Because of the weather and other geographical causes, Manchu women wore shoes with thick soles, commonly known as “horse hoof shoes”. However, as they became older the height of their soles reduced gradually, and sometimes they even wore flat shoes.

3 标题-清乾隆黄缎彩绣皮里马蹄底鞋 关键词-清代旗鞋.jpgYellow Silk Embroidered “Horse Hoof Shoes”

3 标题-清代满族紫地花蝶动物纹刺绣高底鞋 关键词-清代旗鞋;.jpgManchu Purple Embroidered High Heeled Shoes with Animal Design

3 标题-清康熙绿色缎缉米珠珊瑚珠凤纹头尖底鞋 关键词-清代旗鞋.jpgGreensilk Satin Crested Thick-Soled Shoes

3 清代湖色缎绣盘长纹花盆底鞋.jpgEmbroidered “Horse Hoof Shoes” with Lake Blue Silk Strings of Beads

3 清代黄色缎绣花卉纹花盆底鞋.jpgYellow Satin Floral Embroidered “Horse Hoof Shoes”

3 清代蓝缎彩绣暗八仙钉.jpgBlue Satin Embroidered Horse Hoof Shoes with Design of Covert Eight Immortals

3 清代蓝地绣花元宝底棉鞋.jpgBlue Satin Ingot-Shaped Cotton Padded Shoes

3 清代满族白缎地马蹄底鞋.jpgManchu Women’s White Satin Horse Hoof Shoes

3 清代湖色缎绣人物纹元宝底鞋.jpgLake Blue Satin Embroidered Ingot-Shaped Shoes with Character Designs

3 清代蓝地金鱼荷花纹刺绣高底鞋.jpgBlue Satin Ingot-Shaped Cotton Padded Shoes

3 清光绪 红色缎緝线绣花卉纹元宝底棉鞋副本.jpgRed Floral Ingot-Shaped Cotton Padded Shoes

The Manchu women’s shoes became more exquisite and luxurious after hundreds of years of development. These shoes are a landmark of the Qing dynasty’s footwear. People from all over the world have been amazed at the extraordinariness of Qing footwear.

 

About Interact China


“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide” 

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 3000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Kungfu Clothing, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.


P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!

If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

 

Chinese Shoe Culture (II) Why Were Toes Upturned?

Upturned toecap shoes are the most typical kind of ancient Chinese shoe. Yet if we look at the global history of shoes, we find that an upturned toecap is a common feature of ancient shoes from many different cultures. Shoes with upturned toecaps began in the Qin Dynasty. During the Spring and Autumn Period, these shoes were highly valued by people. In the Tang dynasty, people made many colorful upturned toecap shoes.

 2 唐 赤舄.jpgRed Shoes · The Shang Dynasty

2 宝相花锦履 唐.jpgFlower Brocade Shoes · The Tang Dynasty

2 翘头兰绢鞋.pngUpturned Blue Silk Shoes

2 翘头绮鞋.pngUpturned Damask Shoes

2 唐代履头款式.jpgUpturned Toecap Style in the Tang Dynasty

Pointed shoes and “three-inch lotus” shoes originated in the Five Dynasties period and developed into “tip of the small feet” shoes in the Song dynasty.

2 江西明墓出土的明代翘尖弓鞋(三寸金莲裹脚女性用鞋).jpgUpturned Pointed Shoes · The Ming Dynasty

After the Qing dynasty, women generally wore shoes with thick soles, which were called “lotus” shoes and round head shoes. Except for boots, Men wore similar styles of shoes to what people wear today. A new trend of “flat shoes” was formed in the Qing dynasty. However, ethnic groups in southwest and northwest China still make and wear beautiful upturned toecap shoes.

2 翘尖绣花布鞋 彝族传统布鞋,翘尖,绣彩色花纹,适宜在山区穿着行走.pngUpturned Embroidered Shoes · The Yi Ethic Group in China

 2 旧时西藏僧官所穿长筒船形靴。靴面为金丝花缎料,靴帮用多层白布纳制而成,厚实坚硬。靴尖呈船形,靴底为双层皮革,靴筒用紫红色氆氇制成。孜忠鞋.pngZi Zhong shoes, a pair of knee high boat boots from a Tibetan monk in old days

 2 Jin_Wu_Di.jpg

Why were ancient shoes upturned? There are 4 reasons:

 

  1. Ancient Chinese wore long coats and long dresses. These upturned toecap shoes could provide some support for those long clothes to prevent people from slipping and falling.
  2. Upturned toecap shoes could better prevent people from accidentally hitting dangerous objects, and protect them from some acute injuries.
  3. The upturned part is made with soles that are resilient. This design could extend the useful life of the shoes.
  4. Upturned toecap shoes share the same features as the apexes of ancient buildings. It could be explained that this design was to show respect to gods and supernatural beings.

 

About Interact China


“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide” 

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 3000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Kungfu Clothing, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.


P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!

If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

 

Chinese Shoe Culture (I) Learning from Nature

It has been deduced that the earliest Chinese footwear was made of a hide called “foot-binding skin” or “hide socks”. Chinese ancestors learned not only to use animal skin to keep their feet warm, but also to use small leather straps and hairy hide to wrap their feet in for protection during their struggles against nature.

1 烧卖皮鞋

After a long time, the hide socks shaped like “Baozi” (a type of steamed, filled bun or bread-like item in various Chinese cuisines), evolved into leather shoes shaped like “Shao Mai” (a type of traditional Chinese dumpling), and are still popular today.

1 乌拉鞋和乌拉草

In modern times, the wula shoes of Northern China also retain the shape of the original Chinese shoes.

1 鱼皮鞋

The present-day fish shoes of the Nanai people from Northern China are also inspired by the original Chinese shoes.

It was a great leap for the original hide shoes when they evolved into more complicated straw shows. China has at least seven thousand years of history using the leaves and stems of plants as raw materials to weave clothing and accessories.

1 芦编童鞋3.jpg

1 草鞋.jpg

Straw sandals were popular in every region of ancient China. This is because it was extremely convenient to obtain the raw materials in order to make them, and they felt light and comfortable to wear.

1 芦编童鞋.jpg

Children’s Reed Woven Sandals

1 麻线鞋.jpgLinen Shoes

Linen can be made into thread by weaving and by spinning. As social production systems advanced, people found that clothes could be made more delicate, softer, and more resilient with the use of wild linens. The Chinese made a variety of woven shoes and shoe accessories.

 1 东晋编织履.jpg Woven Shoes · The Eastern Jin Dynasty

1 东晋织成履.jpgWoven Shoes · The Eastern Jin Dynasty

1 蒲草鞋 唐.jpgBulrush Shoes· Tang Dynasty

In this chapter, from hide shoes and woven straw shoes, to textile shoes, we see how Chinese people have presented the world with their splendid shoe culture, using only materials from nature.

 

About Interact China


“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide” 

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 3000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Kungfu Clothing, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.


P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!

If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

CHINESE LADY LINGERIE IN ANCIENT CHINA (5) – Stories in Totems

Ancient people of China used totems to record many beautiful stories and heroes in their hearts, so as to express their feelings and to make sure future generations remember them.

 

  1. The Eight Immortals

121.pngThe Eight Immortals (Chinese: 八仙; pinyin: Bāxiān; Wade–Giles: Pa¹-hsien¹) are a group of legendary Xian (“immortals”) in Chinese mythology. Each immortal’s power can be transferred to a tool (法器) that can bestow life or destroy evil. Together, these eight tools are called the “Covert Eight Immortals” (暗八仙). Most of them are said to have been born in the Tang or Song dynasty. They are revered by the Taoists and are also a popular element in the secular Chinese culture. They are said to live on a group of five islands in the Bohai Sea (a sea on the coat of north China), which includes the Penglai Mountain-Island.

无标题.png

 

  1. The Bridge Breaking Meeting – Legend of the White Snake

104.pngThe Legend of the White Snake, also known as Madame White Snake, is a Chinese legend which existed in spoken tradition long before there was any written compilation. It has since been presented in a number of major Chinese operas, films and television series.

The story is now counted as one of China’s Four Great Folktales, the others being Lady Meng Jiang, Liang Shanbo and Zhu Yingtai, and The Cowherd and the Weaving Maid (Niulang Zhinü).

 

  1. Goddess Meeting – The Cowherd and the Weaving Maid 

602.pngThe Cowherd and the Weaving Maid is a Chinese folk tale. The general tale is a love story between Zhinü (織女; the weaving maid, symbolizing the star Vega) and Niulang (牛郎; the cowherd, symbolizing the star Altair). Their love was not allowed, thus they were banished to opposite sides of the Silver River (symbolizing the Milky Way Galaxy). Once a year, on the 7th day of the 7th lunar month, a flock of magpies would form a bridge to reunite the lovers for one day. There are many variations of the story. The earliest-known reference to this famous myth dates back to over 2600 years ago, which was told in a poem from the Classic of Poetry.

 

  1. Wu Song Slays the Tiger

416.pngWu Song Slays the Tiger is a story in Shi Naian’s “the Water Margin”. The story says that when in Liangshan the hero Wu Song was on the way to back home to visit his brother and when he was passing by the placed called Jingyanggang he drank 18 bowls of wine in the restaurant and he was drunk. He was told that a tiger on the hill would hurt people and was advised not to move on. Wu Song didn’t believe this and sure enough he met a tiger. Wu Song fought with his fists and killed it, removing the pest for the local people. Then, it became a popular tale.

 

  1. Kirin Brings the Child

605.pngThe qilin (Chinese: 麒麟; pinyin: qílín) or kirin is a mythical hooved chimerical creature known of in Chinese and other East Asian cultures, it is said to appear with the imminent arrival or passing of a sageor an illustrious ruler. It is a good omen thought to show the occasions of prosperity or serenity. It is often depicted with what looks like fire all over its body.

 

  1. Liu Hai Plays with a Toad

603.pngLiu Hai Plays with a Toad is an ancient Chinese folk tale, derived from Taoist illusions. When Liu Hai was young he cut firewood in the mountains and rescued an injured toad with only three feet. After, the toad became a beautiful girl and married him with the skill of spitting out money and gold ingots. Therefore,in folk Chinese tales, the toad has the role of acquiring wealth and exorcising evil spirits.

 

  1. Di Qing on the War

604.pngDi Qing was born to a poor family in Xihe, Fenzhou (汾州西河; present-day Fenyang, Shanxi). He sported tattoos on his face and excelled in mounted archery. In 1038, during the reign of Emperor Renzong of Song, Di Qing was appointed as Commander (指揮使) of Yanzhou (延州; covering parts of present-day Shaanxi). He participated in the war between Song and Western Xia. Each time he went to war, he would don a bronze mask and let his hair run wild and disheveled, charging onto the battlefield. Di Qing participated in a total of 25 battles in his lifetime. Of these battles, he was best known for his night raid on the Kunlun Pass on the 15th day of the first lunar month in 1053. He died at age 48.

 

 

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About Interact China


“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide” 

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 3000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Kungfu Clothing, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.


P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!

If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

CHINESE LADY LINGERIE IN ANCIENT CHINA (2) —Various Shapes on Little Pieces

Unlike the three-dimensional structure of Western lingerie, Chinese ancient lingerie is made up of layers and it implicitly shapes the rich curve of the female body.

From the outline, there are usually square, diamond, rectangle and fan shapes, triangle shapes, petal shapes, T shapes, cross shapes, Ruyi (a curved scepter, used in Chinese Buddhism) shapes and other, more complex shapes.

 

201.pngRectangle Dudou: Period – Middle Qing Dynasty

 

 

202.pngFan Shaped Dudou: Period – The Republic of China Era

 

 203.pngDiamond Shaped Dudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty

 

 

204.pngComplexly Shaped Dudou: Period – Middle Qing Dynasty

 

The pictographic shape shows the imagination of the ancient people of China. It conveys moral implications in a person’s life.

 

 

205.pngTiger Shaped Underwear: Period – Middle Qing Dynasty

To banish evil and pray for peace

 

 

 206.pngIngot Shaped Dudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty

Generally used in children’s underwear and used for wishing for a steady stream of future wealth

 

 

 207.pngCalabash Shaped Dudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty

One of the treasures held by Tieguai Li, one of the eight immortal gods, this Dudou prays for god’s blessing

 

 

208.png Ruyi Shaped Dudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty

Used to express one’s wishes for good luck

 

 

209.png Beef Tongue Shaped Underwear: Period – Middle Qing Dynasty

Used to embody elegance and depth of knowledge.

 

 

According to the characteristics of different shapes, there are many wearing styles, and each has its own style and discretion for showing the body’s curves.

210.jpgSome examples of methods to wear a Dudou

 

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Chinese underwear from the past pursues the integration of details and the whole piece to complement to each other. The main pieces are connected with other structures to create a new decoration called Nashao meaning to avoid breaking off connections/ severing ties, which is not an auspicious sign.

 

 214.jpgNashao partten

 

Rich and varied shapes highlight the traditional feminine pursuit of beauty and the desire to show themselves.

 

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About Interact China


“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide” 

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 3000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Kungfu Clothing, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.


P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!

If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

CHINESE LADY LINGERIE IN ANCIENT CHINA (3) – The Connotations of Colour

We can read a lot of from the color of traditional lingerie. There are different colour schemes for different scenes, areas and identity, as well as other aspects of life.

Different colours have different symbolic meanings and have different connotations to different people.

Red: happiness, marriage, elimination of a disaster, passion, indulgence

304.png

Corset: Period – Middle Qing Dynasty

 

Yellow: royalty, value, power, religion (Buddhism) and fantasy

305.png

Dudou: Period – Early Qing Dynasty

306.png

Dudou: Period – Middle Qing Dynasty

 

Purple: wealth, mystery, power, depression and melancholy

307.png

Dudou: Period – Middle Qing Dynasty

 

Green: nature, civil, purity, life and youth

302.pngDudou: Period – Middle Qing Dynasty

 

Blue: elegance, purity, civil and modest

308.pngDudou: Period – The Republic of China Era

311.pngDudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty

 

Brown: maturity, honesty, modesty and tolerance

315.pngPaddy Field Dudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty

 

Black: stability, strength, mystery and depth

301.pngDudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty

 

White: simple, childish, bright and religion (Muslim)

303.pngPart Dudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty

 

Gold and silver: success, luxury, auspiciousness and nobility

317.pngPart Dudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty

321.pngPart Dudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty

 

Traditional Chinese underwear often uses progression of colour gradients.

312.pngPart Dudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty

 

Like traditional Chinese clothing, traditional lingerie also shows class through use of colour. There is an order of colour that shows one’s class, from nobility to middle class: bright yellow, gold and silver – purple – red – brown – green – blue – black, white and gray.

The colour of lingerie is also related to age. Dark colours such as dark brown, dark blue and black are often used by middle-aged women.

At the same time, the use of colour in ancient Chinese lingerie has a strong geographical connection. Such as:

  • Jiangnan (an area in southern China) woman love light green and light blue.
  • Shaanxi (province in northwest China) people prefer to use a variety of colour combinations  containing gray.

  • The Saibei plateau (a region in northwest China) like to embroider colourful patterns on white cloth.

  • The Minnan (region in southeast China) loves geometric patterns as well as embroidery of birds and flowers on a black and white background

 

The different colours used will bring different visual effects and feelings to people.

319.pngPart Dudou: Period – The Republic of China Era

Using intense colour contrast brings strong emotions.

 

316.pngBody Coat: Period – The Republic of China Era

Low saturation decor with a bright red background displays an elegant style.

 

322.pngPart Dudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty

Good use of complementary colours creates a strong visual impact.

 

309.pngPart Dudou: Period – Early Qing Dynasty

The use of similar tones creates a subtle and reserved feeling.

 

318.pngPart Dudou: Period – Middle Qing Dynasty

The combination of small usage of light colours and a small amount of pure block colour makes the piece seem harmonious.

314.pngDudou: Period – Middle Qing Dynasty

The decorative use of the same colour is simple and generous.

 

The rich knowledge and intuition of this traditional lingerie colour shows the exquisite thinking of the ancient people of China.

 

 

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About Interact China


“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide” 

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 3000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Kungfu Clothing, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.


P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!

If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!

CHINESE LADY LINGERIE IN ANCIENT CHINA (1) – Aspiration Beyond Body

Throughout the development of Chinese women lingerie, ancient Chinese lingerie has been used to express the yearns for beauty and the performance of feeling and of body in delicate, subtle ways. Almost every piece of lingerie has a theme and story. The Dudou is a bodice that has been used by women since ancient China. The production cycle of each piece lasts from a few months to several years, and there are differences in craft techniques used to produce them. The Chinese women of the past conveyed the voices of their hearts through the sewing, and colourful totems to convey their deep wishes.

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Dudou: Period – The Republic of China; Totem – three wishes

Pomegranate, Bergamot and Peach-Shaped Flowers express the wish for more children longevity and happiness.

 

100.pngCorset: Period – The Republic of China; Totem – fame and wealth

In Chinese, “公(公鸡)鸣” (Gōngmíng) meaning a rooster’s crow sounds like “功名”(Gōngmíng) meaning fame. The peony is a symbol of the rich.

 

111.pngCorset (back): Period – Middle Qing Dynasty; Totem – safe and prosperous

In Chinese, “瓶”(píng) means vase and “平(平安)”(Píng’ān) means safety. This homophone along with the varieties of blooming flowers symbolize a rich and powerful family.

 

131.pngDudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty; Totem – highly incorruptible

 

101.pngCorset (back): Period – Early Qing Dynasty; Totem – fragrant lotus

The lotus is a symbol of incorruptibility, it is rooted in mud and has luxuriant foliage which symbolizes a stable career and prosperous family.

 

121.pngPart Dudou: Period – The Republic of China; Totem – eight treasures of Tai Chi

In Chinese mythology there are eight immortals. Each carry a treasure that has been bestowed with their own power. The treasures embroidered on this Dudou express the deep desire for good luck.

103.pngDudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty; Totem – mandarin duck

Mandarin ducks express the love and happiness between husband and wife.

104.pngDudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty; Totem – to meet on the broken-bridge

The embroidery on this Dudou expresses a deep missing for a lover.

 

150.pngCorset: Period – Early Qing Dynasty; Totem – dragon that plays in the sea

 

153.pngDudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty; Totem – dragon

A dragon on underwear symbolizes bravery, honour, wisdom and unpredictability.

 

119.pngPart Dudou: Period – The Republic of China; Totem – Qilin stepping on clouds

Qilin is regarded as a mascot and blessing of national peace and order, It is also a messenger of happiness and posterity.

 

107.pngDudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty; Totem – tiger

 

161.pngPart Dudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty;·Totem – tiger

 

109.pngDudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty; Totem – tiger driving away the five poisonous pests

The tiger is a symbol of a spirit that drives out demons.

 

160.pngDudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty; Totem – a lion playing with a ball

 

108.pngDudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty; Totem – gold lion

The lion is regarded as a mascot and blessing for driving away evil, praying for good health and is also a symbol of festive events.

 

134.pngDudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty; Totem – butterflies in love with flowers

 

112.pngDudou: Period – Late Qing Dynasty; Totem – butterflies in love with flowers

 

113.pngDudou: Period – The Republic of China; Totem – butterflies in love with flowers

In Chinese, the ” 芙蓉”(Fúróng) meaning Hibiscus and “夫荣”(Fūróng) meaning Husband’s glory is a homophone. Hibiscus flowers with butterflies is a symbol for a woman of low birth may marrying a man of high status and can therefore enjoy a life with the benefits of her husband’s glory however to be a good wife she must dance to her husband’s tune in order to have a harmonious marriage.

 

The extended meaning in the totems expresses people’s life expectations, and also allows for future generations to interpret them.

 

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About Interact China


“A Social Enterprise in E-commerce Promoting Oriental Aesthetic Worldwide” 

Aileen & Norman co-founded Interact China in 2004 with specialization in fine Oriental Aesthetic products handmade by ethnic minorities & Han Chinese. Having direct partnerships with artisans, designers, craft masters and tailors, along with 10 years solid experience in e-commerce via InteractChina.com, we position well to bridge talented artisans in the East with the rest of the world, and bring you direct finely selected products that are of good quality and aesthetic taste.

So far we carry 3000+ goods covering Ladies Fashion, Kungfu Clothing, Home Furnishings, Babies & Kids, Painting Arts, Textile Arts, Carving Arts, Tribal Jewelry Art, Wall Masks and Musical Instruments. Our team speak English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, and serve customers worldwide with passion and hearts.


P.S. We Need People with Similar Passion to Join Our Blogging Team!

If you have passion to write about Oriental Aesthetic in Fashion, Home Decor, Art & Crafts, Culture, Music, Books, and Charity, please contact us at bloggers@interactchina.com, we would love to hear from you!